Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

v3.21.2
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
9 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2021
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements of the Company are unaudited, and have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“US GAAP”) for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, this interim quarterly financial report does not include all disclosures required by US GAAP. In the opinion of the Company’s management, the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, considered necessary to present fairly the financial position, results of operations and cash flows of the Company and its consolidated subsidiaries for all periods presented. The results of operations for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2021 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future or for the full fiscal year. It is recommended that these condensed consolidated financial statements be read in conjunction with the Company’s consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included in its 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on March 16, 2021.

These condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with US GAAP applicable for an “emerging growth company” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (“JOBS Act”). The JOBS Act provides, among others, that an emerging growth company can take advantage of an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In particular, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would apply to private companies. For the purpose of these condensed consolidated financial statements, the Company availed itself of an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards and, as a result, did not adopt new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for public companies.

Liquidity

The Company evaluated its ability to continue as a going concern. The Company has negative cash flows from operating activities through September 30, 2021. The condensed consolidated balance sheet as of September 30, 2021 includes total current assets of $199.4 million and total current liabilities of $116.0 million, resulting in net current assets of $83.4 million.

The Business Combination generated significant obligations including (i) $13.1 million of liabilities related to non-recurring Business Combination transaction related costs; (ii) $15.0 million of deferred consideration to the Sellers in the Business Combination transaction; (iii) $13.2 million of net obligations under certain Shares Purchase Forward Agreements entered into by GigCapital, Inc. prior to the Business Combination; and (iv) $3.6 million of notes payable acquired as a result of the Business Combination. As of September 30, 2021, the Company only had $405,000 of remaining obligations as a result of the Business Combination.

On February 18, 2021, and for the purposes of raising the cash portion of the consideration for the Merger, the Company entered into the PIPE Subscription Agreements with the PIPE Investors and the Convertible Note Subscription Agreements with the Convertible Note Investors. Pursuant to these agreements, and prior to the closing of the Merger on June 1, 2021, the Company issued and sold in private placements an aggregate of $105 million or 8,400,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to the PIPE Investors at $12.50 per share, and $200 million aggregate principal amount of unsecured Merger Convertible Notes.

Considering the effects of the financings described above and the typical financial cycle of the Company, the Company’s management believes that the Company’s cash and availability of borrowings, will be sufficient to support its planned operations for at least the next 12 months from the date these condensed consolidated financial statements were issued.

Business seasonality

Historically, the Company has experienced clear seasonality in its revenue generation, with slower traction in the first calendar quarter, and increasing revenues as the year progresses. The Company typically experiences higher revenues in messaging and notification services during the fourth calendar quarter. This patterned revenue generation behavior takes place due to the Company’s customers sending more messages to their end-user customers who are engaged in consumer transactions at the end of the calendar year, resulting in an increase in notifications of electronic payments, credit card transactions and e-commerce orders.

Principles of Consolidation

The condensed consolidated financial statements include the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries, including Kaleyra S.p.A., Solutions Infini, Buc Mobile, The Campaign Registry and Kaleyra US Inc., which represent its major operations. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with US GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. These estimates are used for, but not limited to, the allowance for doubtful accounts; the valuation of the Company’s stock-based awards; the recoverability of long-lived and intangible assets; the capitalization and useful life of the Company’s capitalized internal-use software development costs; the fair values and estimated lives of acquired intangible assets; accruals and contingencies, including the tax related provision and the valuation allowance on deferred taxes. Estimates are based on historical experience and on various assumptions that the Company believes are reasonable under current circumstances. However, future events are subject to change and best estimates and judgments may require further adjustments; therefore, actual results could differ materially from those estimates. Management periodically evaluates such estimates and they are adjusted prospectively based upon such periodic evaluation. Actual results and outcomes may differ from management’s estimates and assumptions due to risks and uncertainties, including uncertainty in the current economic environment due to the outbreak of a novel strain of the coronavirus (“COVID-19”).

Concentration of Credit Risk

Financial instruments that potentially expose the Company to a concentration of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash, short-term investments and trade receivables. The Company maintains its cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash and short-term investments with financial institutions that management believes are financially sound.

The Company sells its services to a wide variety of customers. If the financial condition or results of operations of any significant customers deteriorate substantially, operating results could be adversely affected. To reduce credit risk, management performs ongoing credit evaluations of the financial condition of significant customers. The Company maintains reserves for estimated credit losses on customer accounts when considered necessary. Actual credit losses may differ from the Company’s estimates. In both the three months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, there was one customer that individually accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s consolidated total revenue. In the nine months ended September 30, 2021 and 2020, there was zero and one customer that individually accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s consolidated total revenue. In the three months ended September 30, 2021, revenue generated by that one customer accounted for $9.2 million and another customer accounted for $4.9 million in three months ended September 30, 2020. In the nine months ended September 30, 2020, revenues generated by that one customer accounted for $10.5 million. As of September 30, 2021 and December 31, 2020, one individual customer in both periods accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s consolidated total trade receivables. Trade receivables accounted for by that one customer amounted to $8.5 million as of September 30, 2021 and another customer accounted for $4.5 million in trade receivables as of December 31, 2020.

Warrant Liability

The Company accounts for warrants for shares of the Company’s common stock that are not indexed to its own stock as liabilities at fair value on the condensed consolidated balance sheets. The warrants are subject to remeasurement at each balance sheet date and any change in fair value is recognized in “Financial expense, net” on the condensed consolidated statements of operations. The liability is included in the condensed consolidated balance sheet line item “Other long-term liabilities”. The Company will continue to adjust the liability for changes in fair value until the earlier of the exercise or expiration of the common stock warrants. At that time, the portion of the warrant liability related to the common stock warrants will be reclassified to additional paid-in capital.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2021, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2021-04 “Earnings Per Share (Topic 260), Debt—Modifications and Extinguishments (Subtopic 470-50), Compensation— Stock Compensation (Topic 718), and Derivatives and Hedging—Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815- 40) Issuer’s Accounting for Certain Modifications or Exchanges of Freestanding Equity-Classified Written Call Options” which clarifies and reduces diversity in an issuer’s accounting for modifications or exchanges of freestanding equity-classified written call options (for example, warrants) that remain equity classified after modification or exchange. An entity should measure the effect of a modification or an exchange of a freestanding equity-classified written call option that remains equity classified after modification or exchange as follows: i) for a modification or an exchange that is a part of or directly related to a modification or an exchange of an existing debt instrument or line-of-credit or revolving-debt arrangements (hereinafter, referred to as a “debt” or “debt instrument”), as the difference between the fair value of the modified or exchanged written call option and the fair value of that written call option immediately before it is modified or exchanged; ii) for all other modifications or exchanges, as the excess, if any, of the fair value of the modified or exchanged written

call option over the fair value of that written call option immediately before it is modified or exchanged. The amendments in this update are effective for all entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, including interim periods within those fiscal years. An entity should apply the amendments prospectively to modifications or exchanges occurring on or after the effective date of the amendments. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In January 2021, the FASB issued ASU 2021-01 “Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848)”, which clarifies that certain optional expedients and exceptions in Topic 848 for contract modifications and hedge accounting apply to derivatives that are affected by the discounting transition. Specifically, certain provisions in Topic 848, if elected by an entity, apply to derivative instruments that use an interest rate for margining, discounting, or contract price alignment that is modified as a result of reference rate reform. Amendments in this update to the expedients and exceptions in Topic 848 capture the incremental consequences of the scope clarification and tailor the existing guidance to derivative instruments affected by the discounting transition. The amendments in this update apply to all entities that elect to apply the optional guidance in Topic 848. The amendments do not apply to contract modifications made after December 31, 2022 or new hedging relationships entered into after December 31, 2022. For existing hedging relationships evaluated for effectiveness in periods after December 31, 2022, an exception is made for those hedging relationships that apply certain optional expedients in which the accounting effects are recorded through the end of the hedging relationship (including periods after December 31, 2022). The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the optional expedients and exceptions of this standard on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In August 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-06 “Debt—Debt with Conversion and Other Options (Subtopic 470-20) and Derivatives and Hedging — Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40) Accounting for Convertible Instruments and Contracts in an Entity’s Own Equity” which is aimed to address issues identified as a result of the complexity associated with applying generally accepted accounting principles for certain financial instruments with characteristics of liabilities and equity. In addressing the complexity, the FASB focused on amending the guidance on convertible instruments and the guidance on the derivatives scope exception for contracts in an entity’s own equity. For convertible instruments, the Board decided to reduce the number of accounting models for convertible debt instruments and convertible preferred stock. Limiting the accounting models results in fewer embedded conversion features being separately recognized from the host contract as compared with current GAAP. Convertible instruments that continue to be subject to separation models are (1) those with embedded conversion features that are not clearly and closely related to the host contract, that meet the definition of a derivative, and that do not qualify for a scope exception from derivative accounting and (2) convertible debt instruments issued with substantial premiums for which the premiums are recorded as paid-in capital. The amendments in this update are effective for public business entities that meet the definition of a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filer, excluding entities eligible to be smaller reporting companies as defined by the SEC, for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, including interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, the amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2023, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, but no earlier than fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company adopted the amendments in this update as of the beginning of its annual fiscal year 2021, and the adoption did not have a material impact on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In June 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-05 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) and Leases (Topic 842): Effective dates for certain entities” (“ASU 2020-05”), which provides a limited one year deferral of the effective dates of the following updates (including amendments issued after the issuance of the original update) to provide immediate, near-term relief for certain entities for whom these updates are either currently effective or imminently effective: i) ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) (“Revenue”); ii) ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) (“Leases”). In November 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-10 “Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326), Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815), and Leases (Topic 842): Effective Dates” (“ASU 2019-10”). The amendments in this ASU amended certain effective dates for the above ASU 2016-02, Leases (including amendments issued after the issuance of the original ASU). The effective dates for Leases after applying ASU 2019-10 were as follows: public business entities, excluding emerging growth companies and smaller reporting companies, for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. All other entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021. Early application continues to be allowed. In ASU 2019-10, the FASB noted that challenges associated with transition to a major update are often magnified for private companies and smaller public companies. Those challenges have been significantly amplified by the current business and capital market disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. For this reason, the FASB issued the amendments in ASU 2020-05 by deferring the effective date for one additional year for entities in the “all other” category that have not yet issued their financial statements (or made financial statements available for issuance) reflecting the adoption of Leases. Therefore, under the amendments, Leases (Topic 842) is effective for entities within the “all other” category for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. Early application continues to be permitted, which means that an entity may choose to implement Leases before those deferred effective dates. While the Company expects the adoption of the Leases standard (Leases Topic 842) to result in a material increase to the reported assets and liabilities, the Company has not yet determined the full impact that the adoption of this standard will have on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In February 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-02 “Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326) and Leases (Topic 842), Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 119 and Update to SEC Section on Effective Date

Related to Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). This ASU applies to all registrants that are creditors in loan transactions that, individually or in the aggregate, have a material effect on the registrant’s financial condition. This ASU guidance is applicable upon a registrant’s adoption of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 326. On November 15, 2019, the FASB delayed the effective date of ASC Topic 326 for certain small public companies and other private companies. As amended, the effective date of ASC Topic 326 was delayed until fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022 for SEC filers that are eligible to be smaller reporting companies under the SEC’s definition, as well as private companies and not-for-profit entities. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In November 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-10 “Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326), Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815), and Leases (Topic 842): Effective Dates”. The amendments in ASU 2019-10 amend certain effective dates for the following major ASUs (including amendments issued after the issuance of the original ASU):

a)ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326): Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments (Credit Losses) (“ASU 2016-13”). The amendments in this ASU amend the mandatory effective dates for Credit Losses for all entities as follows: Public business entities that meet the definition of a SEC filer, excluding entities eligible to be smaller reporting companies as defined by the SEC, for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. All other entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early application continues to be allowed. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

b)ASU 2017-12, Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities (Hedging). The effective dates for Hedging after applying this ASU are as follows: Public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. All other entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021. Early application continues to be allowed. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-15, “Intangibles—Goodwill and Other—Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer's Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That is a Service Contract”. This standard aligns the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred in a hosting arrangement that is a service contract with the requirements for capitalizing implementation costs incurred to develop or obtain internal-use software. The standard is effective for public business entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, the amendments in this ASU are effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2020, and interim periods within annual periods beginning after December 15, 2021. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in any interim period, for all entities. The amendments in this ASU should be applied either retrospectively or prospectively to all implementation costs incurred after the date of adoption. The Company adopted the amendments, and the adoption did not have a material impact on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-14, “Compensation—Retirement Benefits—Defined Benefit Plans—General (Subtopic 715-20)”, which modifies the disclosure requirements for employers that sponsor defined benefit pension or other postretirement plans. The amendments are effective for fiscal years ending after December 15, 2020 for public business entities and for fiscal years ending after December 15, 2021 for all other entities. Early adoption is permitted for all entities. The Company adopted the amendments, and the adoption did not have a material impact on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, “Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment”, which removes the second step of the goodwill impairment test that requires a hypothetical purchase price allocation. A goodwill impairment will now be the amount by which a reporting unit's carrying value exceeds its fair value, not to exceed the carrying amount of goodwill. This guidance is effective prospectively for public business entities for annual or interim goodwill impairment tests in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020 and for annual or interim goodwill impairment tests in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021 for other entities. Early adoption is permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, “Financial Instruments—Credit Losses: Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments”, which changes the impairment model for most financial assets. The new model uses a forward-looking expected loss method, which will generally result in earlier recognition of allowances for losses. In November 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-19, “Codification Improvements to Topic 326, Financial Instruments— Credit Losses”, which clarifies that receivables arising from operating leases are not within the scope of Topic 326, Financial Instruments—Credit Losses. Instead, impairment of receivables arising from operating leases should be accounted for in accordance with Topic 842, Leases. These ASUs are effective for public entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years, and for other entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020 and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021. Earlier application is permitted. As noted above, the effective date of this ASU has now been delayed for two years by the issuance of ASU 2019-10. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, “Leases”, which was further clarified by ASU 2018-10, Codification Improvements to Topic 842, Leases, and ASU 2018-11, Leases—Targeted Improvements, both issued in July 2018. ASU 2016-02 affects all entities that lease assets and will require lessees to recognize a lease liability and a right-of-use asset for all leases (except for short-term leases that have a duration of less than one year) as of the date on which the lessor makes the underlying asset available to the lessee. For lessors, accounting for leases is substantially the same as in prior periods. ASU 2018-10 clarifies or corrects unintended application of guidance related to ASU 2016-02. The amendment affects narrow aspects of ASU 2016-02 related to the implicit rate in the lease, impairment of the net investment in the lease, lessee reassessment of lease classification, lessor reassessment of lease term and purchase options, variable payments that depend on an index or rate and certain transition adjustments. ASU 2018-11 adds a transition option for all entities and a practical expedient only for lessors. The transition option allows entities to not apply the new lease standard in the comparative periods they present in their financial statements in the year of adoption. Under the transition option, entities can opt to continue to apply the legacy guidance in ASC 840, “Leases”, including its disclosure requirements, in the comparative prior periods presented in the year they adopt the new lease standard. Entities that elect this transition option will still be required to adopt the new leases standard using the modified retrospective transition method required by the standard, but they will recognize a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings in the period of adoption rather than in the earliest period presented. The new standards are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years for a public business entity. For all other entities, the amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. Earlier application is permitted. As noted above, the effective date of this ASU has now been delayed for two years by the issuance of ASU 2020-05. While the Company expects the adoption of these standards to result in a material increase to the reported assets and liabilities, the Company has not yet determined the full impact that the adoption of this standard will have on its condensed consolidated financial statements.