Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

v3.20.2
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2020
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements of the Company are unaudited, and have been prepared in accordance with US GAAP for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, this interim quarterly financial report does not include all disclosures required by US GAAP. In the opinion of our management, the unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, considered necessary to present fairly the financial position, results of operations and cash flows of Kaleyra and our consolidated subsidiaries for all periods presented. The results of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2020 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected in the future or for the full fiscal year. It is recommended that these condensed consolidated financial statements be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto included in our 2019 Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on April 22, 2020.

These condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in conformity with US GAAP applicable for an “emerging growth company” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (“JOBS Act”). The JOBS Act provides, among others, that an emerging growth company can take advantage of an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In particular, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would apply to private companies. For the purpose of these condensed consolidated financial statements, the Company availed itself of an extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards and, as a result, did not adopt new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for public companies.

Liquidity

In connection with Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2014-15, Presentation of Financial Statements-Going Concern (Subtopic 205-40), Disclosures of Uncertainties about an Entity’s Ability to Continue as a Going Concern, the Company evaluated its ability to continue as a going concern. The Company has negative cash flows from operating activities, and its current liabilities exceed its current assets as of June 30, 2020. The condensed consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2020 includes total current assets of $83.1 million and total current liabilities of $94.0 million, resulting in net liabilities due within the next 12 months of $10.8 million.

The Business Combination generated significant obligations including (i) $13.1 million of liabilities related to non-recurring Business Combination transaction related costs; (ii) $15.0 million of deferred consideration to sellers in the Business Combination transaction (iii) $13.2 million of net obligations under certain Forward Share Purchase Agreements entered into by GigCapital, Inc. prior to the Business Combination; and (iv) $3.6 million of notes payable acquired as a result of the Business Combination. As of June 30, 2020, the Company still had the following obligations as a result of the Business Combination:

(i) $2.7 million of liabilities related to non recurring Business Combination transaction related costs;

(ii) $13.5 million of deferred consideration to sellers in the Business Combination transaction; and

(iii) $7.5 million of obligations under certain Forward Share Purchase Agreements entered into by GigCapital Inc. prior to the Business Combination.

On June 24, 2020, the Company entered into an Underwriting Agreement (the “Underwriting Agreement”) with Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. and Nomura Securities International, Inc. acting as joint book-running managers and as representatives of the underwriters named therein (collectively, the “Underwriters”) relating to the issuance and sale of 7,777,778 shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.0001 per share (the “Offering”). The price to the public in the Offering was $4.50 per share, before underwriting discounts and commissions. Under the terms of the Underwriting Agreement, the Company has granted the Underwriters an option, exercisable for 30 days, to purchase up to an additional 1,166,666 shares of common stock at the public offering price less underwriting discounts. The Offering closed on June 29, 2020 and resulted in net proceeds to the Company of approximately $32.0 million, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated Offering expenses payable by the Company, assuming no exercise by the Underwriters of their option to purchase additional shares of common stock.

Subsequent to June 30, 2020, the Underwriters issued notice under the terms of the Underwriting Agreement, that they were partially exercising and closed on their option to purchase an additional 984,916 shares of common stock by the Company at the public offering price less underwriting discounts. On the settlement date of July 24, 2020 the additional net proceeds from the overallotment option amounted to $4.2 million, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated Offering expenses payable by the Company. See Note 19 – Subsequent Events – for further details.

Considering the effects of the Offering described above and the typical financial cycle of Kaleyra, Kaleyra’s management believes that the Company’s cash, cash flows from operations, debt and equity financings and availability of borrowings, will be

sufficient to support its planned operations for at least the next 12 months from the date these condensed consolidated financial statements were issued.

Business seasonality

The Company’s results are affected by the business cycles of its customer base, which generally results in stronger revenue in the fourth quarter of the calendar year. We believe this variability is largely due to the market demand for our customers’ and/or business partners’ services due to higher levels of purchasing activity in the holiday season. As a result of our historically higher portion of sales in the fourth quarter of each year, our cost of revenue increases during such period relative to any increase in revenue. The increase in cost of revenue and other impacts of seasonality may affect profitability in a given quarter.

Principles of Consolidation

The condensed consolidated financial statements include the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries, including Kaleyra S.p.A., Solutions Infini and Buc Mobile, which represent its major operations. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with US GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. These estimates are used for, but not limited to, allowance for doubtful accounts; valuation of the Company’s stock-based awards; recoverability of long-lived and intangible assets; capitalization and useful life of the Company’s capitalized internal-use software development costs; fair value of acquired intangible assets and goodwill; accruals and contingencies, including tax related provision and valuation allowance on deferred taxes. Estimates are based on historical experience and on various assumptions that the Company believes are reasonable under current circumstances. However, future events are subject to change and best estimates and judgments may require further adjustments; therefore, actual results could differ materially from those estimates. Management periodically evaluates such estimates and they are adjusted prospectively based upon such periodic evaluation. Actual results and outcomes may differ from management’s estimates and assumptions due to risks and uncertainties, including uncertainty in the current economic environment due to the recent outbreak of a novel strain of the coronavirus (“COVID-19”).

Concentration of Credit Risk

Financial instruments that potentially expose the Company to a concentration of credit risk consist primarily of cash and cash equivalents, restricted cash, short-term investments and trade receivables. The Company maintains cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments with financial institutions that management believes are financially sound.

The Company sells its services to a wide variety of customers. If the financial condition or results of operations of any significant customers deteriorate substantially, operating results could be adversely affected. To reduce credit risk, management performs ongoing credit evaluations of the financial condition of significant customers. The Company maintains reserves for estimated credit losses on customer accounts when considered necessary. Actual credit losses may differ from the Company’s estimates. In the three months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, there were one and three customers, respectively, that individually accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s consolidated total revenue. In the six months ended June 30, 2020 and 2019, there were zero and three customers, respectively, that individually accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s consolidated total revenue. In the three months ended June 30, 2020, revenues generated by that one customer accounted for $3.7 million. In the three months ended June 30, 2019, revenue generated by those three customers accounted for $4.9 million, $3.9 million and $3.2 million, respectively. In the six months ended June 30, 2019, revenue generated by those three customers accounted for $9.7 million, $7.3 million and 6.3 million, respectively. As of June 30, 2020 and December 31, 2019, no individual customer accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s consolidated total trade receivables.

Reclassifications

Certain reclassifications have been made to the 2019 presentation to conform to the current period’s presentation, none of which had an effect on total assets, total liabilities, stockholders’ equity (deficit), or net loss.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In June 2020, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU 2020-05 “Revenue from contracts with customers (Topic 606) and Leases (Topic 842): Effective dates for certain entities”, which provides a limited deferral of the effective dates of the following Updates (including amendments issued after the issuance of the original Update) to provide immediate, near-term relief for certain entities for whom these Updates are either currently effective or imminently effective: i) Accounting Standards

Update No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) (Revenue); ii) Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) (Leases). In November 2019, the Board issued ASU 2019-10 “Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326), Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815), and Leases (Topic 842): Effective Dates”. The amendments in this ASU amended certain effective dates for the above ASU 2016-02, Leases (including amendments issued after the issuance of the original ASU). The effective dates for Leases after applying ASU 2019-10 were as follows: Public business entities; not-for-profit entities that have issued or are conduit bond obligors for securities that are traded, listed, or quoted on an exchange or an over-the-counter market; and employee benefit plans that file or furnish financial statements with or to the SEC for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. All other entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021. Early application continues to be allowed. In Update 2019-10, the Board noted that challenges associated with transition to a major Update are often magnified for private companies, smaller public companies, and NFP entities. Those challenges have been significantly amplified by the current business and capital market disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. For this reason FASB issued the amendments in this ASU 2020-05 by deferring the effective date for one additional year for entities in the “all other” category and public NFP entities that have not yet issued their financial statements (or made financial statements available for issuance) reflecting the adoption of Leases. Therefore, under the amendments, Leases (Topic 842) is effective for entities within the “all other” category for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. Early application continues to be permitted, which means that an entity may choose to implement Leases before those deferred effective dates. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

In March 2020, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASU 2020-04 “Reference Rate Reform (Topic 848): Facilitation of the Effects of Reference Rate Reform on Financial Reporting”, which provides optional guidance for a limited period of time to ease the potential burden in accounting for (or recognizing the effects of) reference rate reform on financial reporting. The amendments in this ASU provide optional expedients and exceptions for applying generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) to contracts, hedging relationships, and other transactions affected by reference rate reform if certain criteria are met. The amendments apply to contract modifications that replace a reference rate (e.g. LIBOR) affected by reference rate reform and contemporaneous modifications of other contract terms related to the replacement of the reference rate (including contract modifications to add or change fallback provisions). The following optional expedients for applying the requirements of certain Topics or Industry Subtopics in the Codification are permitted for contracts that are modified because of reference rate reform and that meet certain scope guidance: (i) modifications of contracts within the scope of Topics 310, Receivables, and 470, Debt, should be accounted for by prospectively adjusting the effective interest rate; (ii) modifications of contracts within the scope of Topics 840, Leases, and 842, Leases, should be accounted for as a continuation of the existing contracts with no reassessments of the lease classification and the discount rate or remeasurements of lease payments. For other Topics or Industry Subtopics in the Codification, the amendments also include a general principle that permits an entity to consider contract modifications due to reference rate reform to be an event that does not require contract remeasurement at the modification date or reassessment of a previous accounting determination. When elected, the optional expedients for contract modifications must be applied consistently for all eligible contracts or eligible transactions within the relevant Topic or Industry Subtopic. The amendments in this ASU are effective for all entities as of March 12, 2020 through December 31, 2022. The Company adopted the amendments, and the adoption did not have a material impact on its condensed consolidated financial statements.

In March 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-03 “Codification Improvements to Financial Instruments”, which improves various financial instruments Topics in the Codification in order to increase stakeholder awareness of the amendments and to expedite the improvement process. The amendments in this ASU clarify or address stakeholders’ specific issues as described below:

 

i.

Issue 1: Fair Value Option Disclosures: The amendments clarify that all entities are required to provide the fair value option disclosures in paragraphs 825-10-50-24 through 50-32.

 

ii.

Issue 2: Applicability of Portfolio Exception in Topic 820 to Nonfinancial Items: Paragraphs 820-10-35-2A(g) and 820-10-35-18L are amended to include the phrase nonfinancial items accounted for as derivatives under Topic 815 to be consistent with the previous amendments to Section 820-10-35.

 

iii.

Issue 3: Disclosures for Depository and Lending Institutions: The amendments clarify that the disclosure requirements in Topic 320 apply to the disclosure requirements in Topic 942 for depository and lending institutions.

 

iv.

Issue 4: Cross-Reference to Line-of-Credit or Revolving-Debt Arrangements Guidance in Subtopic 470-50: The amendments improve the understandability of the guidance.

 

v.

Issue 5: Cross-Reference to Net Asset Value Practical Expedient in Subtopic 820-10: The amendments improve the understandability of the guidance.

 

vi.

Issue 6: Interaction of Topic 842 and Topic 326: The amendments clarify that the contractual term of a net investment in a lease determined in accordance with Topic 842 should be the contractual term used to measure expected credit losses under Topic 326.

 

vii.

Issue 7: Interaction of Topic 326 and Subtopic 860-20: The amendments to Subtopic 860- 20 clarify that when an entity regains control of financial assets sold, an allowance for credit losses should be recorded in accordance with Topic 326.

For Issue 1, 2, 4 and 5, for public business entities, the amendments are effective upon issuance of this final ASU. For all other entities, including emerging growth companies as defined in the JOBS Act, the amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. Early application is permitted. The Company adopted the amendments in the three-month period ended March 31, 2020, and the adoption did not have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

For Issue 3, the effective dates and transition requirements for the amendments are the same as the effective dates and transition requirements in ASU 2019-04, for the guidance related to the amendments in ASU 2016-01. The effective date of ASU 2019-04 for the amendments to ASU 2016-01 is for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, including interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company adopted the amendments in the three-month period ended March 31, 2020, and the adoption did not have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

For Issue 6 and 7, the effective dates and transition requirements for the amendments are the same as the effective dates and transition requirements in ASU 2016-13. For entities that have not adopted the amendments in ASU 2016-13, the effective dates and the transition requirements for these amendments are the same as the effective date and transition requirements in ASU 2016-13 which for an emerging growth company is in 2023. Early adoption is permitted in any interim period as long as the entity has adopted the amendments in ASU 2016-13. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

In February 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-02 “Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326) and Leases (Topic 842), Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 119 and Update to SEC Section on Effective Date Related to Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842)”. This ASU applies to all registrants that are creditors in loan transactions that, individually or in the aggregate, have a material effect on the registrant’s financial condition. This ASU guidance is applicable upon a registrant’s adoption of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 326. On November 15, 2019, the FASB delayed the effective date of ASC Topic 326 for certain small public companies and other private companies. As amended, the effective date of ASC Topic 326 was delayed until fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022 for U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) filers that are eligible to be smaller reporting companies under the SEC’s definition, as well as private companies and not-for-profit entities. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

In January 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-01 “Investments—Equity Securities (Topic 321), Investments—Equity Method and Joint Ventures (Topic 323), and Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815)”, clarifying the Interactions between Topic 321, Topic 323, and Topic 815. The amendments in this ASU clarify the interaction of the accounting for equity securities under Topic 321 and investments accounted for under the equity method of accounting in Topic 323 and the accounting for certain forward contracts and purchased options accounted for under Topic 815. The amendments clarify that: (a) an entity should consider observable transactions that require it to either apply or discontinue the equity method of accounting for the purposes of applying the measurement alternative in accordance with Topic 321 immediately before applying or upon discontinuing the equity method; (b) an entity should not consider whether, upon the settlement of the forward contract or exercise of the purchased option, individually or with existing investments, the underlying securities would be accounted for under the equity method in Topic 323 or the fair value option in accordance with the financial instruments guidance in Topic 825. For public business entities, the amendments in this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020, and interim periods within those fiscal years. For all other entities, including emerging growth companies as defined in the JOBS Act, the amendments are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, including early adoption in an interim period, (1) for public business entities for periods for which financial statements have not yet been issued and (2) for all other entities for periods for which financial statements have not yet been made available for issuance. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820) Disclosure Framework—Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement”. The amendments under ASU 2018-13 remove, add, and modify certain disclosure requirements on fair value measurements in ASC 820. In particular, the following disclosure were added: (i) The changes in unrealized gains and losses for the period included in other comprehensive income for recurring Level 3 fair value measurements held at the end of the reporting period; (ii) The range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements. The amendments are effective for all entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2019. The amendments on changes in unrealized gains and losses, and the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements should be applied prospectively for only the most recent interim or annual period presented in the initial fiscal year of adoption. All other amendments should be applied retrospectively to all periods presented upon their effective date. The Company adopted the amendments in the three-month period ended March 31, 2020, and the adoption did not have a material impact on its condensed consolidated financial statements.